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Focus on... Public-private partnerships

Partnerships are about building relationships, establishing trust, and sharing resources and risks, as well as demonstrating a common interest. But partnerships in any context are not always easy to establish or sustain, and this is equally true in agricultural research and development. However, when successful, partnerships build on the complementarities and comparative advantages of the partners involved, the resulting synergy serves as a constructive means of enhancing production, service delivery and technology development, which would be difficult to achieve by individual partners alone.

Partnerships and networks vary depending on the context. There are no set rules for establishing partnerships, but facilitation or a catalyst is often required and general principles can be observed in how partnerships function effectively. In this edition of New Agriculturist, we focus on public-private partnerships (PPPs) involving a wide range of partners at regional and national levels. Public partners include research institutes, universities, extension agencies and NGOs, whilst private partners may be multinational corporations, entrepreneurial businesses or producer associations. Government and international cooperation agencies often provide a supporting role.

From livestock health to public health, aquaculture, horticulture, cereals and staples, we focus on some of the public-private partnerships that are resulting in successful agricultural research and development around the globe.

Livestock and livelihoods: a partnership approach

Livestock and livelihoods: a partnership approach

An initiative to improve livestock production in Namibia has stimulated a public-private partnership to provide animal health services and other inputs.

Date published: May 2010

Transforming cereal production in South Asia

Transforming cereal production in South Asia

In the bread and rice baskets of South Asia, cereal production has stalled. In response, four of the CG centres have launched the Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA), a ten year programme that aims to transform cereal production in the region.

Date published: May 2010

Acquiring land in Honduras

Acquiring land in Honduras

In Honduras, 50 per cent of the rural population has little or no access to land. Working through public-private partnerships, the Access to Land Project is helping families to acquire land and establish profitable and sustainable farm enterprises.

Date published: May 2010

PPP - shortcut to progress

PPP - shortcut to progress

In Africa, dilapidated warehouses stand empty, while farmers living nearby get low prices for their grain because they have nowhere to store it until prices improve. But this wasted resource is also an opportunity, one that is now being exploited by the Tanzania Agriculture Partnership.

Date published: May 2010

Fishing for private expertise

Fishing for private expertise

Aquaculture currently produces more than 50 per cent of all fish and seafood products that are consumed worldwide. With ongoing intensification and global networking, aquaculture is creating an increasing demand for infrastructure and supporting public services, resulting in a diversity of public-private partnerships (PPPs).

Date published: May 2010

Partnering to improve tef

Partnering to improve tef

Tef is Ethiopia's main cereal crop, but compared to other major cereals tef produces very low yields due to a weakness of the stem which causes the plant to fall. To increase its productivity, a public-private partnership is developing semi-dwarf varieties that will be resistant to lodging.

Date published: May 2010

Cassava development in the networking age

Cassava development in the networking age

In Costa Rica and Panama, as in nine other countries, the consortium Clayuca is connecting partners to collaborate on better technologies and markets for the under-valued cassava crop.

Date published: May 2010

Mosquito nets from public health to plant health

Mosquito nets from public health to plant health

A partnership manufacturing long lasting insecticidal nets in Tanzania is looking beyond fighting malaria to potential pest control applications in vegetable farming.

Date published: May 2010

 

 

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