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Focus on... Entrepreneurship

"The only way to tackle underemployment and frustration is to get the youth to dream, and then provide a support system to help them start-up on their own," says Nidhi Arora of the Delhi-based Dhriiti organisation. Dhriiti means 'the courage within', and starting any kind of business certainly takes courage. Yet the examples in this section should inspire confidence that taking the risk can pay off, given a sound business plan and sufficient start-up capital.

Examples include efforts by remote Pacific island communities to establish trading centres, women's groups in Andhra Pradesh now profiting from vermiculture (worm farming) and high value crops, and the work of Benin's Songhai Centre to disseminate a successful training programme for rural agri-business development. Ugandan chilli trader Pamela Anyoti Peronaci illustrates what determination and vision can achieve, sourcing chillies for her export business from just 15 farmers in 2007, and from over 1,000 today. You can hear more from her in the 11-03 podcast.

Indian women using science to start agribusinesses

Indian women using science to start agribusinesses

Access to science and technology is limited in rural areas. But in Andhra Pradesh in India, the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics has been teaching women how to use science to shift from subsistence farming to successful agribusinesses - lifting themselves and their communities out of poverty.

Date published: May 2011

Practical training for rural entrepreneurs

Practical training for rural entrepreneurs

Benin's Songhai Centre is rolling out its blueprint for rural agribusiness development, through a network of satellite training centres.

Date published: May 2011

Promoting farmer entrepreneurship in Mozambique

Promoting farmer entrepreneurship in Mozambique

In Mozambique, the Dutch Agri-Pro Focus partnership is working to boost business skills and improve value chains, through an Agri-Hub network.

Date published: May 2011

Uganda's red hot chilli trader

Uganda's red hot chilli trader

From tiny beginnings in 2007, Uganda's Sunshine Agro Products Ltd now exports over 25 tonnes of bird's eye chillies to Europe per year, sourced from over a thousand growers. Founder and managing director, Pamela Anyoti Peronaci, explains the business model which has won her international recognition.

Date published: May 2011

Sweet smell of success

Sweet smell of success

Starting with lavender and roses, in the last six years Dr Gazalla Amin has built a highly successful oil-extraction business in Kashmir.

Date published: May 2011

Women's enterprises in remote Pacific communities

Women's enterprises in remote Pacific communities

Female entrepreneurship in the Pacific has been steadily rising, driven by educated and confident urban women. The story is different, however, in remote rural areas where women lack information, basic business skills and startup capital.

Date published: May 2011

Encouraging youthful entrepreneurs

Encouraging youthful entrepreneurs

To reduce youth unemployment in India, a Delhi-based NGO is encouraging and supporting youths to set up sustainable small-scale enterprises. Founded in 2004, Dhriiti organises workshops and integrated training programmes in Indian schools to promote entrepreneurship as a respectable and profitable career option.

Date published: May 2011

Funding new opportunities for micro-enterprise development in Colombia

Funding new opportunities for micro-enterprise development in Colombia

By promoting competitive processes that inject funds directly into the hands of small businessmen and women, Colombia's Rural Microenterprise Assets Programme, Oportunidades Rurales, is funding innovation, peace and sustainable development in the Colombian countryside.

Date published: May 2011

Entrepreneurs in agricultural marketing

Entrepreneurs in agricultural marketing

The development of ICTs has helped entrepreneurs like Jacinta Namubiru to undertake marketing activities which would formerly have been restricted to more established figures. Namubiru links groups of farmers to buyers with the help of her network of 23 agents.

Date published: May 2011

 

 

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