text size: smaller reset larger

 

 

Focus on... Coastal livelihoods

From pearl farming in the Pacific to seaweed harvesting on Zanzibar's east coast, coastal livelihoods can seem as exotic as they are fascinating. But earning a living from coastal resources is seldom straightforward, as witnessed by the devastation of tsunamis and the ever-worsening threat posed by rising sea levels. Meanwhile, extreme weather, declining fish stocks and rising soil salinity are putting coastal livelihoods under increasing pressure around the world.

But the response of coastal communities to such challenges is inspiring. In Mozambique, for example, the people of Quirimbas became the first in the world to bring about the creation of a national park to protect their marine resources. In Sulawesi, farmers have adapted their farming to restore productivity to saline land. And Caribbean fisherfolk have found that through creation of a regional network, their voices are being heard by policymakers and planners at the highest level.

Mozambique's marine management success

Mozambique's marine management success

Quirimbas marine national park on the north-east coast of Mozambique is the first in the world to be created at the request of a local community. Through careful rotation of harvesting zones, once threatened stocks of fish and shellfish have been restored.

Date published: June 2011

After the flood - restoring aquaculture in Bangladesh

After the flood - restoring aquaculture in Bangladesh

With the Cyclone Affected Aquaculture Rehabilitation Project (CAARP), the WorldFish Center has learned lessons in resilience from some of Bangladesh's poorest fish and prawn farmers.

Date published: June 2011

The rise, fall and rise of seaweed

The rise, fall and rise of seaweed

Seaweed farming in Zanzibar is arduous and low paid. But by joining into clusters, and through the creation of a processing factory, local seaweed farmers are adding value to their crop and have greater strength in the marketplace.

Date published: June 2011

Pacific island pearls

Pacific island pearls

Pearls adorn some of the wealthiest people in the world, but they can also help fulfil the more modest aspirations of Pacific island coastal communities. With new developments in the region, they now offer one of the most promising opportunities for improving livelihoods.

Date published: June 2011

Back to the sea - recovering from a tsunami

Back to the sea - recovering from a tsunami

When a tsunami hit south-central Chile in February 2010 hundreds of people were killed and the fishing industry was severely damaged. Yet, one year on, with the help of the Government of Chile and the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization, smallscale fishermen are recovering.

Date published: June 2011

Restoring neglected coastal land in Indonesia

Restoring neglected coastal land in Indonesia

In Sulawesi, Indonesia, coastal communities have struggled to grow rice in increasingly saline soil. In response, the Mangrove Action Project has established farmer field schools, which promote saline-tolerant crops and other land-uses.

Date published: June 2011

Sustaining coastal ecosystems in Sri Lanka

Sustaining coastal ecosystems in Sri Lanka

In Sri Lanka, poverty and natural disasters are putting coastal and marine resources under pressure, with potentially disastrous consequences for economies and ecosystems. In response, the Mangroves for the Future initiative is developing links between improved livelihoods and good coastal management.

Date published: June 2011

Caribbean network - fisherfolk join forces

Caribbean network - fisherfolk join forces

Near-shore and reef fisheries in the Caribbean are suffering severe depletion. But the formation of the Caribbean Network of Fisherfolk Organisations is enabling fishing community leaders to push for ecosystem-based fisheries management at national and regional level.

Date published: June 2011

 

 

Have your say

 

The New Agriculturist is a WRENmedia production.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.
Accept
Read more