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Focus on... ICTs in agriculture

In developing countries, information and communication technologies (ICTs) are helping to increase the efficiency, productivity and sustainability of smallscale farms, providing up-to-date information on prices, access to credit and training, and the ability to interact with other farmers.

From an agricultural make-over television programme, to the use of video, radio and mobile phones, we focus on a number of initiatives that are using ICTs to provide farmers in developing countries with the information they need to be productive and profitable in an increasingly challenging sector.

Shape up that shamba!

Shape up that shamba!

Based in Kenya, Shamba Shape Up is Kenya's first make-over television programme - with an agricultural twist. Produced by Mediae Company in Nairobi, each series guides smallscale farmers in improved pest management, irrigation, cattle rearing, poultry keeping, and other techniques, in an engaging yet informative way.

Date published: September 2012

Digital Green: rethinking extension

Digital Green: rethinking extension

Digital Green works to increase agricultural productivity by training small and marginal farmers via short instructional videos. The organisation collaborates with local partners to train rural communities to produce videos by farmers, of farmers, and for farmers, and promote the exchange of information on agricultural practices.

Date published: September 2012

Growing more maize - with a mobile phone

Growing more maize - with a mobile phone

Six months ago Eric Owandu, from western Kenya, signed up to a regional trial of the new E-Farming text message service that provides him with advice on crop management, fertiliser use and which maize varieties to plant. In its pilot phase, the text messaging service is being assessed to see whether agronomic advice can be effectively disseminated to farmers via mobile phone.

Date published: September 2012

Strengthening rural development with ICT

Strengthening rural development with ICT

In a province of Burkina Faso where over 80 percent of the population is illiterate, the International Institute for Communication and Development has supported use of locally produced visual media, to train farmers in better farming practices. This and other projects have now been evaluated, to learn lessons about the effective use of ICT to boost rural economic development.

Date published: September 2012

e-Krishok: promoting ICTs to farmers in Bangladesh

e-Krishok: promoting ICTs to farmers in Bangladesh

In Bangladesh, availability of timely and appropriate information is a big challenge due to an inefficient extension system. To address this, the Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development launched the e-Krishok initiative, whereby farmers can access information by mobile phone (SMS and an expert call back service) and email. From a pilot in ten locations, the service is now available via 350 telecentres across the country.

Date published: September 2012

Phone advice helps rice farmers earn more

Phone advice helps rice farmers earn more

In partnership with the Philippines Department of Agriculture, the International Rice Research Institute has developed an internet-based tool, an SMS service and an app for smartphones to provide rice farmers with advice on the optimal timing, amount, and type of fertiliser to apply to their crop to maximise production and profit and reduce waste.

Date published: September 2012

The key to bagging bigger markets

The key to bagging bigger markets

In Zambia, Connect Africa has established a permaculture demonstration plot which illustrates how information and communication technologies can develop agricultural potential. Volunteers are trained in growing high-value crops, while applying sustainable and cost-effective farming practices and employing ICTs on a regular basis to ensure appropriate markets for their improved produce.

Date published: September 2012

 

 

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ICTs in agriculture I have read the article. The article is ... (posted by: Jagdish L Desai)

 

The New Agriculturist is a WRENmedia production.

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