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Focus on... Horticulture in the city

For the poorest people in the world, wasteland means opportunity, no matter how small the plot. With a little creativity and investment, boxes, tyres, plastic bags and bottles can nurture fresh lettuce, peppers, and a variety of other vegetables and herbs. This month, we focus on the rooftop gardens, backyard enterprises and peri-urban plots that supply fresh produce to the world's cities, and find out why household gardening is the most common form of urban horticulture in the world.

In Kibera, the largest slum in Africa, wastewater irrigation supports crop and fodder production, bringing dignity and hope to many. In Lima's poor quarter of Villa Maria del Triunfo, fresh vegetables are on display at weekly markets, while in Cuba, profits from urban horticulture are ploughed back into community enterprises. We also look at techniques which allow farmers to grow their produce into the hot summer months. From hydroponics to grafting, we discover that such enterprises not only increase food security and fresh produce for the world's burgeoning urban population, but provide a good income for urban growers as well.

Hydroponics - a simple solution to limited land

Hydroponics - a simple solution to limited land

Hydroponic agriculture recycles nutrients, produces up to six times the yield in less than one-third the space. The process does not have to be complicated.

Date published: March 2007

Drip irrigating the gardens of the Sahel

Drip irrigating the gardens of the Sahel

Based on a low-cost, low-pressure drip irrigation system, the African market garden project is enabling farmers to better control their use of water and fertilisers, thereby reducing costs and increasing yields.

Date published: March 2007

Nourishing inspiration in Sri Lanka's model garden

Nourishing inspiration in Sri Lanka's model garden

The majority of urban home-gardening families in Sri Lanka grow for domestic needs. But in semi-urban areas and villages, mangoes and avocadoes are deliberately grown for market. It's all about having the right knowledge.

Date published: March 2007

A creative enterprise: Horticulture in Lima

A creative enterprise: Horticulture in Lima

Can growing food in backyards, buckets, barrels and vacant lots, really offer a viable source of income in the cities of Latin America?

Date published: March 2007

Grafting a healthier tomato in Hanoi

Grafting a healthier tomato in Hanoi

Tomatoes are popular in Vietnam, and fetch a tidy profit in the market. Grafting tomatoes onto eggplant roots has created a hardier plant which can maintain production for many more months than in the past.

Date published: March 2007

Wastewater irrigation empowers Kenya's urban farmers

Wastewater irrigation empowers Kenya's urban farmers

In fields close to Kibera and other informal settlements, access to urban wastewater is enabling Kenya's poorer urban farmers to produce nutritious, affordable vegetables, bringing renewed hope, dignity and empowerment.

Date published: March 2007

Being street-wise to jasmine

Being street-wise to jasmine

The jasmine industry is a major income earner for the urban and peri-urban poor in the Philippines. However, the industry is beset by bad practices, including overuse of pesticides and poor diversity in its genetic base. UPWARD, a science and development network, is helping to find some solutions.

Date published: March 2007

 

 

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