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Brazilian tribe owns carbon rights in Amazon

Because of their stewardship role over the generations, indigenous groups have legal rights over their forest resources (The Surui)
Because of their stewardship role over the generations, indigenous groups have legal rights over their forest resources
The Surui

According to one of the world's largest law firms, the Surui, a Brazilian tribe in the Amazon, owns carbon rights and can claim benefits under any deals involving Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) arrangements. "This finding should greatly help the Surui and, by extension, other indigenous groups in Brazil," explains Beto Borges, director of communities and markets programs at Forest Trends, a conservation group. "Not only do the indigenous groups have the ethical right for carbon credits projects on their land because of their stewardship role over the generations, but this finding now means they have the legal right as well."

While not legally binding, this finding states that under REDD deals, the Surui would be able to oversee management of the forest as well as reap any economic benefits from carbon trading arrangements. "This study is an important political and legal instrument to recognize the rights of indigenous people for the carbon standing in their forests," explains Chief Almir Narayamoga Surui, leader of the tribe. "It helps in our dialogue with the government, businesses and other sectors, strengthening the autonomy of indigenous peoples to manage our territories."

Date published: January 2010

 

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This information is very interesting though it lacks valuabl... (posted by: Michael O)

 

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