text size: smaller reset larger

 

 

New fertiliser applicator boosting yields in Bangladesh

The applicator places fertiliser at the required depth, two rows at a time (© BARI)
The applicator places fertiliser at the required depth, two rows at a time
© BARI

Designed for deep placement of urea briquettes in puddled rice fields, a new low-cost fertiliser applicator, designed by the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI), is helping farmers to reduce the amounts of fertiliser they use and boost their yields. Scientists, extension workers and farmers were all involved in the design and development of the applicator, which places the fertiliser at the required depth, two rows at a time. About 3,000 machines are already in use by farmers in over 30 districts of Bangladesh, and another 5,000 are being produced to be used for field-based demonstrations.

In Bangladesh, urea has become an important fertiliser for rice, but statistics indicate that only 15 to 35 per cent of the total nitrogen applied is used by the crop. To improve the efficiency of fertiliser use, 2 million Bangladeshi farmers have taken up urea deep placement - inserting granules at regular intervals 8-10cm down into the soil. However, inserting the granules by hand is time consuming, hence the development of the applicator, by BARI's Farm Machinery and Postharvest Engineering Division.

Written by: Dr Abdul Wohab, BARI

Date published: March 2011

 

Have your say

 

The New Agriculturist is a WRENmedia production.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.
Accept
Read more