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Netting mosquitoes doubles milk production

The nets have cut the number of disease transmitting insects by almost 90% (© FAO/Simon Maina)
The nets have cut the number of disease transmitting insects by almost 90%
© FAO/Simon Maina

The use of insecticide-impregnated nets to surround livestock shelters used for zero grazing has doubled, and in some cases tripled milk production on smallholder dairy farms in Kisii, Kenya. The nets have cut the number of flies, mosquitoes and other disease transmitting insects by almost 90 per cent and cases of mastitis, a bacterial disease spread in a number of ways, including flies, have been halved. The nets have also reduced cases of malaria in humans by 40 per cent. "Now the cows are happy, they don't waste energy stomping their feet and flicking their tails, and they are converting feed better, gaining weight and producing more milk," explains Rajinder Saini, an entomologist with icipe, FAO's implementing partner. "I used to get around 2 litres of milk a day, but since the nets were brought and the flies disappeared, I now get around 4 or 5 litres a day, so I make a profit," says farmer Mary Munyega Nyandeo.

Date published: May 2013

 

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