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GFAR

The Global Forum on Agricultural Research (GFAR) brings together all those working to strengthen and transform agricultural research for development around the world. As part of this role, GFAR is working with New Agriculturist to showcase and raise awareness of important initiatives and their outcomes, to update and inspire others.

Research and innovation... Ecosystem services

Recognition of the wider value of ecosystem services in agricultural systems is growing rapidly and agricultural research and innovation systems are increasingly incorporating the significance of ecosystem benefits directly into their work. In this edition, GFAR highlights some inspiring initiatives in this area around the world, to help inform, connect and develop new actions that further enhance ecosystem services in agriculture.

view Ecosystem services as pdf view Ecosystem services as pdf

Letting nature manage its battles

Letting nature manage its battles

Advice for managing rice pests, such as planthoppers, has taken on a simple message: let nature have its way in your fields. In a statement calling for support on pesticide regulation and for a ban of the use of specific insecticides in rice that contribute to planthopper outbreaks, the International Rice Research Institute has offered alternative practices to better manage pests.

Date published: January 2012

Ecosystem services in support of a greener revolution in Africa

Ecosystem services in support of a greener revolution in Africa

Malawi's subsidy programme for fertiliser and improved maize seed has been heralded as a triumph. But to test the hypothesis that crop diversity would offer improved ecosystem services and enhanced food security, a group of researchers initiated a country-wide trial, comparing monocultural maize production with a more diversified system.

Date published: January 2012

Realising the benefits of enhanced agrobiodiversity

Realising the benefits of enhanced agrobiodiversity

The 2008 food price crisis provided dramatic evidence for the fragility of both agricultural production and the wider food economy in many developing countries. To stabilise and improve productivity and yields, a group of stakeholders have called for a wide array of underutilised crops to be retained and promoted.

Date published: January 2012

 

 

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